leighandgill

Archaeology in East Oxford

Various Updates

Nothing specific going on, just continuing with this and that, though some interesting stuff has come to light.

First off, Olaf has sent me the following images following on from our morning in South Park.

Olaf’s professionally presented results showing the sample points from when we did the initial test walk. Imagery © Bing Maps/Microsoft Corporation and its data suppliers – this applies to the next 2 images as well.

Pretty slick, eh. Pity it doesn’t reproduce so well at this sort of resolution, though the background image does show up the ridges and furrows rather nicely. I’ve extracted the relevant bit and blown it up a bit – what you are looking at is the processed result of the scan overlayed with a red circle showing each point at which a sample was taken.

The same image, enlarged, so it’s hopefully a bit clearer.

We all did a few back and forth scans, then Olaf did the wander around (this was before opening time, honest!). The next shot is of the processed results, again blown up a bit from the centre of the image Olaf sent me.

The processed results of our wandering around.

The spotty bits are where we bounced a bit while carrying the GPS, but you can clearly see the ridge and furrow – the slightly strange bits at the top right and bottom left are where the software didn’t have enough data to work on and was trying to be creative.

So that was the “proof of concept” trial, and it seems to have worked pretty well, so Olaf went off this morning and met up with Andy to strap the GPS on to the tractor and do the real data collection run. I’ve heard it went OK, and Jo sent me this photo –

The GPS unit strapped to the front of the tractor.

Olaf went back to the gaffer tape, I see – I’m looking forward to the final result, I’m just hoping the tractor didn’t bounce around too much. With no suspension and the bumpiness of the terrain it could be a problem, but we can only wait and see what comes out in the processing.

We’ve also found a lot more about the Enclosure map, or maps. Graeme came across this map http://www.icowley.info/words/15,and started to look into it a bit more. I contacted the web site in question, but they just pointed me at the Oxfordshire History Centre. Graeme eventually found this new map on microfilm at the OHC, which has opened up some new avenues which he and Christopher are looking into. With the help of Carl Boardman, History Services Manager at the OHC, we realised that when the Enclosure award was worked out, the commissioners had their own working copies of the maps, which ended up in London, and are now at The National Archive. They also deposited one copy with the diocese, which is the one at the OHC, and another copy with the parish – this one often got lost. As I said, new avenues to look down.

And talking about maps, the digitising of the Cowley Enclosure map is coming on – I’ve done the rivers and streams, the existing roads (as of 1853) and the roads which were to created after the enclosure, and I’ve made a start on the houses with their surrounding property. Here is a quick glimpse of how far I’ve got.

The whole map.

And a close up –

Temple Cowley

Just as I was about to publish this post, Olaf phoned me up, alerting me to a couple of emails he had sent me about the results of today’s topo survey – they look great – and I’ll do a report about that tomorrow.

Leigh

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